Archive for Free

Have you tried Canva?

My favorite new tool is Canva, a graphic design tool that makes it super easy to create images for social media, flyers for sharing, and cards for printing. You can choose from free or $1.00 templates, photos, or icons to create images or PDF’s that you can download or save in your design stream.  Check out some of the images that I have created to publicize our Pet Therapy Study Break, Afternoon Tea, & other messages for Twitter and Facebook posts. One nice feature of Canva is that you can choose the size of your image to fit perfectly into posts on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram as well as headers for social media and email. Canva also offers helpful tutorials on design plus inspiration from cool designers to follow on Instagram. Join the over 2 million members on Canva and start creating your own super designs.

HandInPaw

GOOD LUCK2sunshinegood luckMolly3

Inbox for Gmail: a better way to manage email

Almost everyone already loves Gmail but what if you could make it better?  InBox transforms your mail from the familiar home screen to a more organized, color-coded interface.

Create this magic on your desktop, tablet or phone by requesting an invite (see below) and downloading the app.  I love that I can try it out and still get back to the familiar if needed.  In other words, I can use both at the same time.

The big difference besides the cleaner home page is that mail now works more than ever as a to-do list.  If you use your inbox in that way, you will love InBox.
Options for handling messages in InBox include:

  • Pin–move to the top; stay in front of me; you are important
  • Snooze–need to deal with this but not today; go away until I am ready to do something with you
  • Done–finished with you, go away
  • Bundle–you all go together

Get InBox by sending an email inbox@google.com to request an invite.  Mine came right away, they don’t seem hard to get.

It has taken some time to get comfortable with the new interface.  For me the hardest part is seeing that I have a new message, that just does not seem as apparent as I’m used to.

I have played with my bundles to make them more useful (moving messages in or out to “teach” Google which are appropriate) and that has helped.

The hardest part of it for me is the lack of a delete button.  I know that it isn’t actually doing anything different, that deleted messages are still THERE but with InBox they seem in the way more.

I don’t know yet if I will stick with InBox but it is worth trying out for sure.

Of course Lifehacker has a great post about using InBox, How InBox by Google works, and How to Use it for More Productive Email.

Try it out.  Let me know what you think.

Meet Browzine™ Turn your tablet into your e-reader!

Keep up to date with your scholarly reading with Browzine™, a new way of browsing and reading your favorite journals from many major publishers on your iPad, iPhone, Kindle Fire, Android Tablet or Android phone. BrowZine is free. All licensed content is provided via UAB Libraries.

Browzine

store

Get started in two EASY steps:

1.  Download the free Browzine app for your device.

2. When installed, choose University of Alabama at Birmingham as your university library. Use your Blazer ID/password when prompted.

Choose

Why use Browzine?

  • to scan the complete tables of contents of scholarly journals and read articles optimized for mobile devices
  •  to get one-click from journal tables of content to the PDFs of the articles you want to read
    • save specific articles for later reference and offline reading
    • create a bookshelf of your favorite journals for easy, fast access
  • to receive on screen notifications when new issues of your favorite journals are published

Other features:BrowZine_Article_Export_Options_iOS

  • Find journals by searching or browsing a title list, or by using a Browzine bookshelf chosen by subject.
  • Annotate or print articles by opening them in your favorite apps like Good Reader or iAnnotate.

Questions?

Pushbullet

Pushbullet is a great, free app designed to allow you to easily move items between your computer and mobile devices.

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As promised, it is very easy to get started:

pushbullet get started

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I downloaded the app to my iPhone and iPad and added the Chrome extension to my computer.  I logged in with my Gmail account and that was it.  I could then use the app on my mobile devices to push items such as photos, files, and links to my computer.  I sent a couple of things from home and when I got to work the next morning there was a pop-up on my computer with the information.  Computer does need to be on though, when I sent one over the holiday it didn’t go through and I couldn’t easily resend it.

I did the same thing from my computer, using the Pushbullet icon in Chrome and instantly pushed files or links from one to the other.

Now I do have other options for moving things between devices but this is so fast and easy I likely will never use the other options again.  As I don’t have an Android phone I don’t have all the options (yet) but still find this FREE app to be a great time saver.

There are also some great IFTTT recipes for Pushbullet.

Apparently this app has been around for a while, I just missed it somehow.  If you have been using it and have suggestions on how to make the most of it, let us know in the comments.

Altmetrics: What is the Buzz about Your Article?

Last week, I saw that Altmetric, a company that measures article level metrics, published their list of the 2014 Top 100 articles.  Here are two examples:

Example 2 Example 3

These are the papers that received the most attention online during 2014 from mainstream news, blogs, social media including Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, YouTube, and Mendeley, and review sites like F1000. They cover a wide range of topics from serious science to those with imaginative titles.

What do you think of the top 100?

Are you curious about the buzz generated by your recent article?

Altimetric offers a free bookmarklet for your browser toolbar that will provide a detailed analysis of article level metrics for any article. Just grab it to install and go to a journal article page and click on the “Altmetric it” icon.

bookmarklet image 1

Here is the Altmetric report for a recent study (published in Sept. 2014.) Notice the details available to show you who is talking about your work. (Click on an image to enlarge it.)

SA1

SA 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intrigued?  Learn more about Altmetrics

“Altmetrics” is an emerging category of impact measurement premised upon the value of “alternative metrics,” or metrics based distinctly on the opportunities offered by the 21st century digital environment according to the ACRL. Frequently presented as a supplemental measure to traditional citation counts and impact factors, it measures the immediate attention generated by a publication and combined with traditional citation counts, journal impact factors, and H-indexes, offers a richer view of the impact of scholarly research.  There are several studies that measure the correlation between early attention to an article and later citation counts.

You may have seen article level metrics on journal article pages from a growing number of publishers, including some PLOS, Nature, Wiley, and Springer journals. Many of these journals include article downloads and page views as well.  Scopus offers Altmetric data in the right sidebar on the article record, allowing you to see both citing articles and article mentions.

Of course there are limitations to the use of these metrics and legitimate concerns about their validity and importance.  To address these issues, NISO (the National Information Standards Organization) has undertaken an initiative to explore, identify, and advance standards and/or best practices related to alt metrics, and has published a draft white paper for public comment.

To learn more about alternative metrics and their use, start here:

Altmetrics: A Manifesto – Jason Priem, Dario Taraborelli, Paul Groth, Cameron Neylon

Altmetrics: A 21st-Century Solution to Determining Research Quality - Stacey Konkiel

 Keeping Up With… Altmetrics – Chin Roemer and Rachel Borchardt.

OurGroceries

When I heard that ZipList was closing down earlier this month, I panicked. As mentioned in my post about ZipList earlier this year, this is one of the top few apps I use on a daily basis. The discontinuation of this app comes at a very bad time of year, so I’ve quickly had to do my research to find a replacement! And since I raved about ZipList and may have even lead some to start using it themselves, I feel the need to direct you all to another shopping list solution!

After reading about and considering a few other shopping list apps (Shopper, GroceryIQ, Grocery Gadget, and others) I have ended up with OurGroceries. (Available for both iOS and Android as well as via most PC web browsers.)

Our Groceries ListOur Groceries List 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So far, am really liking it. As I confessed in my ZipList post, I am not a grocery shopper. I go only when I must. My role is the list maker; my husband’s role is the store-goer. So the ability to share shopping lists in real time, is key. I like to sneak one or two more items on the list while he’s actually at the store!

In addition to list sharing, other shopping list app features I require include the ability to:

  • sign up for an account without linking to Facebook. (This was the deal breaker for Shopper. I did not see a way to share my lists without registering with my Facebook login and like others, I’m still suspicious of “anonymous login.”)
  • make lists for multiple stores: Publix, Target, Home Depot, Beth, Bath, & Beyond, etc.
  • categorize items by type of product and/or aisle in store

I didn’t find myself using ZipList to search for recipes and then automatically add recipe ingredients to my shopping list, so for those who like the sound of that, OurGroceries is probably not for you. You can store recipe names and ingredients but must manually enter that information. There is no place to store the actual recipe instructions. To me, the recipe part of the app is pretty worthless. I guess just having a list of recipe names might be helpful if you’re at a loss for what to cook and need to skim a list.

Some features OurGroceries doesn’t have (or not yet) that some of the other similar apps have include barcode scanning, price tracking, coupon integration, and photos of products. For now at least, I’m enjoying the simplicity of OurGroceries.

There is a free version of OurGroceries, which includes ads. So far, the ads have not been too much of a nuisance to me. For $4.99 (in-app purchase), though, you can upgrade to OurGroceries+ and go ad-free.

SurveyMonkey

I was very surprised to note that we haven’t ever talked about SurveyMonkey on this blog considering I use this tool pretty much every day.  We couldn’t do our jobs at LHL without knowing what you, the users, need from us.  We have lots of ways to get that information but SurveyMonkey is at tool we use to both gather the information and keep track of it.

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We have had a library SurveyMonkey account since 2006 and have more than 250 surveys.  There are several plan options.We started with the Basic (free) plan, moved up to Select pretty quickly and now are Gold customers.  While everyone at the library has access to the surveys and results, we haven’t found that to be a problem.  Especially since you can group them and view your surveys separately.  There is a new Enterprise solution that might be better if you don’t want everyone to have access to everything.

Typically, I create a survey, either from scratch or from an existing survey, though there are lots of templates to edit and use.  The templates are both business and non-profit focused and can be edited to fit your needs.   We usually create a weblink that we embed on our website or send via email.  It is actually very easy to use, though if you are new to creating surveys you might want to plan a bit with the question types to determine how best to ask your question.

We use this tool to solicit information from a target group, for example a survey of faculty on resources or to do a class evaluation.  We also have surveys that we’ve created for our staff to use to track information from users or about things that have happened.  Data is presented in a variety of ways and can be downloaded and shared.

Find out more online or sign up for a free account to give it a try.

There are some other tools out there, Google Forms as an example, but I highly recommend SurveyMonkey.

The Emojli Network :) or :(

You’re either going to love this or really hate it.

A couple of guys from London, Matt Gray & Tom Scott, are getting ready to launch an all emoji social network for iOS called Emojli, which will make exclusive use of the emjoi keyboard on your mobile device.

All the posts will be made up of emoji–only emoji.  Even your username.

It’s certainly not Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, and not intended to be.  For those who get bent out of shape in thinking that texting and tweeting have ruined our ability to communicate in writing, Emojli isn’t that serious.

Emojli is like the Monty Python of Social Networks.  It will be silly.

They hope to make it available on iPhone sometime this month, and for Android soon after.

To reserve your username and watch their promo, click the image below.

Screen Shot 2014-08-05 at 10.35.31 AM

FYI: Before you enter in a username, be sure that you’re comfortable with it.  If you try a username and it hasn’t been taken, it’s yours.  And with over 250,000 two-image combinations still available, you can also waste, I mean spend, a lot of time trying to come up with something clever.

If you do decide to be a part of the big Emojli joke, look me up.  I’m timebomb

 

To add the Emoji keyboard to your iPhone or iPad, follow these steps.

 

Saving in Facebook

Perhaps you already know about this but it was new to me so I thought I would share.  I have lots of librarian colleagues on Facebook and they often share interesting articles that I don’t have time to read during the workday. Sometimes, if they look interesting enough I will open them and clip to Evernote or Pocket but I don’t often bother.  But now there is an option to Save them in Facebook.

HIN FB save

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just click on the tiny down arrow in the top right corner of the post to open the menu pictured above.  Click on Save “name of the post” and the content is saved for future enjoyment!

home saved

 

To get back to the stuff you’ve saved, just look at the top left on the home screen under your profile.  You can see a list of what you saved, when you saved it, who posted it and where it is online.  You can even go back and share the link if you decide the content is worthwhile.  If you click on the “via NPR” by the article it takes you back to the post so you can see the comment and discussion.

saved in FB

I think this is a great feature!  Now I have another place to save articles that I’ll never have time to read!

Your very own food compass: Foodspotting

If you like to discover new restaurants or cuisine, or if you’re of the kind that routinely takes pictures of their food to show off on Facebook, you might be interested in Foodspotting.

FoodspottingLogo

Foodspotting is a app that works with your location, so wherever you are in the world, you can see where and what people are eating.  This is my go-to app when I’m out of town.

Two testimonies:  A few weeks ago I attended the Medical Library Association conference in Chicago.  A friend and I wanted breakfast.  We were walking around for a bit when I decided to pull up my app.  We were able to scroll through dozens of plates posted by other foodspotters.  We picked what looked like a cute brunch place, clicked on the link for directions (which melds really nicely with the navigation on your phone) and walk right to it.  My friend said it the best oatmeal of her life–it did look really good, they bruleed the top!  And I had some really wonderful soft scrambled eggs topped with fried kale.

I also use the app when I’m in a very touristy location–like Gulf Shores, and Savannah, and New Orleans.  I’m not often dazzled by the pirate ships and neon…I want the small local places.  I was able to find a place in Pensacola called Fisherman’s Corner…it is literally under an overpass and hands down has the most unique shrimp and grits I’ve ever seen, and one of the best tasting.

If I had seen this tin can crab on Foodspotting, I probably would have skipped this place.

If I had seen this tin can crab on Foodspotting, I probably would have skipped this place.

In the background is the shrimp & grits--that's a ball of fried grits!

In the background is the shrimp & grits–that’s a ball of fried grits!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pros: If you’re a fan of Yelp Reviews, they are featured with every foodspot.  Quick connection to maps and directions. Great when you’re already on the go.  I’ve never been disappointed with the restaurants I found with Foodspotting.  Less chance of being disappointed in your meal when you can rely on real people to do the research for you.

Cons: There are plenty of pictures of McDonalds, KFC, Pizza Hut, and Starbucks.  And so you have to scroll through some unexciting, typical chain eateries.  There is a desktop version, but it doesn’t have as much to offer.

And on a related note: Birminghamians know that Birmingham is a foodie town.  From our well-renowned fixtures (Highlands, Botega, etc.) to the newly established food trucks (Shindigs, Melt, etc.) this town makes some really good food.  So show the world!  Take a picture of your food, be proud, and post it to Foodspotting!

& follow me JillD!

This pizza was divine!  Gulf Pizza, Algiers, NOLA

This pizza was divine! Gulf Pizza, Algiers, NOLA.