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Altmetrics: Find the Buzz about Your Article

Last week, I saw that Altmetric, a company that measures article level metrics, published their list of the 2014 Top 100 articles.  Here are two examples:

Example 2 Example 3

These are the papers that received the most attention online during 2014 from mainstream news, blogs, social media including Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, YouTube, and Mendeley, and review sites like including F1000. They cover a wide range of topics from serious science to those with imaginative titles.

What do you think of the top 100?

Are you curious about the buzz generated by your recent article?

Altimetric offers a free bookmarklet for your browser toolbar that will provide a detailed analysis of article level metrics for any article. Just grab it to install and go to a journal article page and click on the “Altmetric it” icon.

bookmarklet image 1

Here is the Altmetric report for a recent study (published in Sept. 2014.) Notice the details available to show you who is talking about your work. (Click on an image to enlarge it.)
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SA 2

 

 

Intrigued?  Learn more about Altmetrics

“Altmetrics” is an emerging category of impact measurement premised upon the value of “alternative metrics,” or metrics based distinctly on the opportunities offered by the 21st century digital environment according to the ACRL. Frequently presented as a supplemental measure to traditional citation counts and impact factors, it measures the immediate attention generated by a publication and combined with traditional citation counts, journal impact factors, and H-indexes, offers a richer view of the impact of scholarly research.  There are several studies that measure the correlation between early attention to an article and later citation counts.

You may have seen article level metrics on journal article pages from a growing number of publishers, including some PLOS, Nature, Wiley, and Springer journals. Many of these journals include article downloads and page views as well.  Scopus offers Altmetric data in the right sidebar on the article record, allowing you to see both citing articles and article mentions.

Of course there are limitations to the use of these metrics and legitimate concerns about their validity and importance.  To address these issues, NISO (the National Information Standards Organization) has undertaken an initiative to explore, identify, and advance standards and/or best practices related to alt metrics, and has published a draft white paper for public comment.

To learn more about alternative metrics and their use, start here:

Altmetrics: A Manifesto – Jason Priem, Dario Taraborelli, Paul Groth, Cameron Neylon

Altmetrics: A 21st-Century Solution to Determining Research Quality – Stacey Konkiel

 Keeping Up With… Altmetrics – Chin Roemer and Rachel Borchardt.

Posted in Journals, Publishing, Tips.


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